Registration Information
AKC
Our Boston Terriers are firstly registered/registerable with the American Kennel Club, AKC. The American Kennel Club is
the most known registry across the globe as it has been in operation for over 100 years.

For more information about the American Kennel Club please see this link:
http://www.akc.org

To read the official AKC breed standard written and set by the Boston Terrier breed parent club the Boston Terrier Club
of America (BTCA) please see this link:
http://www.akc.org/breeds/boston_terrier


NOTE TO POTENTIAL CFK PUPPY BUYERS:

Our puppies are placed in homes to be spayed/neutered pets only and are placed with limited AKC registration.

What is "
limited AKC registration"?  Limited registration is for pets that are altered (spayed/neutered) and not for
breeding. If by accident puppies are born to two dogs that are AKC limited registered, AKC will not allow puppies
resulting from that litter to be registered with the AKC at all. When our puppies go to their new homes their registration
applications do not go in their puppy packets.  It is only once proof of alteration (spay/neuter) is supplied by new owner
to CFK and verified that the registration application will be provided along with a letter for proper color registration if
puppy is of non-AKC standard coloration.  

What is proof of alteration? Proof of alteration is the receipt from the vet that the new owner receives at time of pickup
when procedure is paid for OR a spay/neuter certificate from veterinarian who performed the procedure. New owners
may mail a copy,
or take a photo/scan a copy of the spay/neuter certificate or alteration receipt and email it to CFK for
verification. Personal information may be marked out, but please provide the veterinarian's contact information who
performed the procedure for contact. Proof of alteration must be supplied within 7 days from the date of the puppy's 6
month birthday.
Email to ask for a copy of the puppy purchase agreement that is also the spay/neuter contract and
health guarantee which outlines the responsibilities of new owners and breeder as well as the legal repercussions if
contract is breached.


IMPORTANT FOR EVERYONE TO REMEMBER:

Please realize that while some breeders may state that  the dogs of their breeding program are AKC registered (maybe
even with a champion pedigree) this documentation proves the parents to their puppies that are for sale to be both
quality and healthy. In saying this we mean to explain that people will use the registry to try to prove health, rather than
have any health testing done.
*Do not be fooled.* Make sure the breeder knows their dogs are healthy because they in
fact health test (BAER, JHC, CERF, Patella, etc). A dog that is simply "AKC registered but checked by my vet which he
say it's healthy to breed" is not a proven health tested dog. A breeder who has taken the extra time, money, and
responsibility to have their dogs health tested is proud to show certification to those that inquire. Those puppy buyers
should even be provided copies of the health certifications of the parents. It is
important to note that some breeders
register test results with OFA and some do not. This does NOT mean that those breeder's dogs who were health tested
and are not found on the OFA website have failed testing. The OFA does not require test results to be registered with
their organization to be valid. The certificate provided by the veterinarian who performs the procedure is valid
certification. OFA certification must be paid for in addition to health testing costs and is  documentation registered in the
foundation database for Boston Terriers.

The link is to an article on the AKC website which clearly states the paragraph below pertaining to registration not
equalling health nor quality:
http://www.akc.org/reg/about.cfm

From the AKC Registration and Quality website:

"There is a widely held belief that "AKC" or "AKC papers" guarantee the quality of a dog. This is not the case. AKC is a
registry body. A registration certificate identifies the dog as the offspring of a known sire and dam, born on a known
date.
It in no way indicates the quality or state of health of the dog. Quality in the sense of "show quality" is determined
by many factors including the dog's health, physical condition, ability to move and appearance. Breeders breeding show
stock are trying to produce animals that closely resemble the description of perfection described in the breed standard.
Many people breed their dogs with no concern for the qualitative demands of the breed standard. When this occurs
repeatedly over several generations, the animals, while still purebred, can be of extremely low quality."
UCA
The original registry to allow Boston Terriers of non-AKC standard coloring to participate in conformation classes is the
United Canine Association, UCA. In 2008 the administration at the offices of the UCA contacted the
All Color Boston
Terrier Club, ACBTC, stating they were accepting the colors to their list of recognized breeds but wanted the ACBTC to
both name the "new" breed and designate a "rough" breed standard that would be revisited in some years and held to a
more strict guideline once the breed had been allowed to grow in 3-5 years. The "
Colored Boston Terrier" was born
and an agreed upon broad range breed standard was issued.

If you'd like more information on the UCA and to read the official UCA breed standard written and set by the All Color
Boston Terrier Club for the Colored Boston Terrier breed see the links below:
http://ucadogs.com/
http://ucadogs.com/Breed_Info_Colored_Boston_Terrier.htm

UPDATE (December 15, 2015):
There are several alternative registration bodies that are now recognizing the Colored Boston Terrier breed and
allowing colors that are not to AKC standard, to show in conformation classes. One such registration body is the
International Canine Kennel Club. The appeal of the Colored Boston Terrier breed is definitely catching the eyes and
ears of more and more people than they ever have before.